A Day's Journey In Hexes

how many hexes do you travel in a day

The number of hexes one can travel in a day depends on the size of the hex and the speed of travel. A hex can be 1 mile, 5 miles, 6 miles, 12 miles, 24 miles, 30 miles, or 50 miles. A typical walking speed is 24 miles per day, while a fast travel speed is 30 miles per day. A hex can also represent a winding path, in which case the distance travelled is not a straight line. The type of terrain also affects travel speed, with difficult terrain such as forests and mountains slowing travel.

quartzmountain

Hex size: 12 miles from side to side, 7 miles across, 124 square miles in total

Hexes are a useful way to track travel in a game. The size of the hex will determine how long it takes to travel through it. A hex that is 12 miles from side to side and 7 miles across, for a total of 124 square miles, is a good size for a hex. This is because it is large enough that the players cannot see outside of the hex, but small enough that interesting things can be found within it.

The time it takes to travel through a hex will depend on the terrain and the mode of travel. Traveling through a hex on a highway or road will be faster than traveling through a hex with trackless terrain. Traveling by mount will be faster than traveling on foot. A character can also hustle for one hour, but this will cause nonlethal damage. A forced march can be done for more than eight hours, but this will result in a Constitution check and nonlethal damage.

The distance traveled can also be affected by the mode of travel. Hustling will increase the distance traveled, while traveling cautiously or exploring will decrease it.

The actual distance traveled can be determined by rolling 2d6+3 times 10% of the average distance. This will give a result between 50% and 150% of the average distance. A survival check can be made to determine the exact distance traveled.

The number of hexes traveled in a day will depend on the size of the hex and the speed of the travelers. A hex that is 12 miles from side to side will take longer to travel through than a hex that is 6 miles from side to side. The speed of the travelers will also affect how many hexes can be traveled in a day. A group of travelers on foot will be able to travel through fewer hexes than a group of travelers on mounts.

quartzmountain

One hex per day: a typical travel speed

One hex per day is a typical travel speed. This is based on the assumption that a hex is 12 miles across (center to center/side to side) and that a typical travel speed is 24 miles per day. This means that a party can travel one hex per day, or two hexes if they are travelling at a fast pace.

The size of a hex can vary depending on the scale of the map and the level of detail required. A larger hex size, such as 30 miles across, may be more suitable for tracking the territory claimed by a town or tribe, while a smaller hex size, such as 6 miles across, can be used for more detailed tracking of daily travel.

The type of terrain can also affect travel speed. For example, travelling through difficult terrain such as forests or hills may reduce the number of hexes that can be travelled per day. On the other hand, travelling on a road may increase the number of hexes that can be travelled per day.

In addition to terrain, other factors such as weather conditions, the weight of equipment carried, and the physical fitness of the travellers can also impact travel speed. It is important to consider these factors when determining how many hexes can be travelled per day.

quartzmountain

Terrain: mountains, forests, swamps, roads, and more can affect travel speed

Terrain can greatly affect travel speed. For example, a highway is a straight, major, paved road, and is therefore the fastest type of terrain to travel across. A road, on the other hand, is a dirt track or similar causeway, and will slow down travel. A trail is like a road but only allows single-file travel, and a trail in poor repair requires a DC 12 navigation check to follow. Trackless terrain is a wild area with no paths and has a +2 to Navigation DCs.

The size of a hex can also affect travel speed. For instance, a hex that is 12 miles from center to center or side to side will take longer to travel across than a hex that is 8 miles or 4 miles from center to center or side to side.

Additionally, the scale of the hex map can impact travel speed. A hex map with 30-mile hexes will result in a larger world than a hex map with 10-mile hexes. This can affect the perceived size of countries and geographical features, as well as the amount of detail needed to key each hex.

Different rulesets may also have different base travel speeds, which can further impact how long it takes to travel across a hex. For example, in D&D 3E, a normal unencumbered human with a 12" move can cover 24 miles per day, while in D&D 5E, a character with a 30 ft. movement speed can cover 30 miles per day.

Moreover, the mode of travel can affect travel speed. A character who is hustling, marching, or forced marching will be able to cover more distance in a day than a character who is moving cautiously or exploring. The type of mount can also make a difference, with mounts carrying riders at a hustle suffering lethal damage instead of nonlethal damage.

Finally, the presence of encounters or obstacles can slow down travel. For example, a river crossing may require a swim check, while encountering monsters or difficult terrain may result in combat or other delays.

quartzmountain

Travel modes: marching, hustling, and more can affect travel speed

When it comes to travel speed, the mode of travel can make a significant difference. Here are some common travel modes and how they impact speed:

  • Marching: Marching is walking at a steady pace for an extended period. In a day of normal walking, a character can cover a certain distance, typically measured in miles. Marching for more than 8 hours in a day is considered a forced march and can lead to fatigue and non-lethal damage.
  • Hustling: Hustling is a faster pace, similar to jogging. A character can hustle for 1 hour without issues. However, hustling for a second hour results in non-lethal damage, and each additional hour increases the damage. Hustling also makes characters more susceptible to encounters and reduces their perception.
  • Running: Running is the fastest pace and is typically reserved for short bursts or emergencies. Running for extended periods is not feasible, as it leads to exhaustion.
  • Mounts and Vehicles: Mounts, such as horses, can significantly increase travel speed, especially over short distances. Fresh mounts can allow for faster travel over longer distances, but this is rare outside of densely populated areas. Vehicles like wagons and carriages move at the pace of the characters riding them.
  • Water Travel: Travel by water depends on the type of vessel. Characters in waterborne vessels are limited by the speed of the vessel and don't benefit from faster travel modes. Ships can travel for extended periods, up to 24 hours per day.
  • Special Movement: Some creatures and characters possess special movement abilities, such as flying, burrowing, or swimming, which can greatly impact travel speed and the types of terrain they can traverse.

The chosen travel mode also depends on the terrain. For example, hustling or running through difficult terrain, such as dense forests or steep mountains, may not be feasible, and mounts or vehicles may not be available or suitable for all terrains.

Additionally, travel speed can be influenced by other factors, such as the weight of equipment carried, the physical fitness of the travellers, and the presence of encounters or obstacles along the way.

quartzmountain

The Dungeon Master (DM) determines the time a task requires. In a dungeon environment, the adventurers' movement happens on a scale of minutes. In a city or wilderness, a scale of hours is more appropriate. For long journeys, a scale of days works best.

The rules for determining travel time depend on two factors: the speed and travel pace of the creatures moving and the terrain they're moving over.

Every character and monster has a speed, which is the distance in feet that the character or monster can walk in 1 round. This number assumes short bursts of energetic movement in the midst of a life-threatening situation. The following rules determine how far a character or monster can move in a minute, an hour, or a day.

While travelling, a group of adventurers can move at a normal, fast, or slow pace. A faster rate will increase the distance travelled but each party member will suffer a negative penalty to their passive perception. A slower pace allows the group to use stealth to help prevent detection or tracking but they will lose around a third of the distance they would normally travel.

The travel speeds given in the Travel Pace table assume relatively simple terrain: roads, open plains, or clear dungeon corridors. But adventurers often face dense forests, deep swamps, rubble-filled ruins, steep mountains, and ice-covered ground—all considered difficult terrain. You move at half speed in difficult terrain, so you can cover only half the normal distance in a minute, an hour, or a day.

Characters may also travel by wagon, carriage, or other vehicles. Though typically powered by a mountable creature, a vehicle's size, weight, and capability often limit its overall speed, restricting the pace to normal. Waterborne vessels, flying ships, and other atypical travel methods may also have alternative benefits or limitations outlined in their descriptions.

Characters in wagons, carriages, or other land vehicles choose a pace as normal. Characters in a waterborne vessel are limited to the speed of the vessel, and they don’t suffer penalties for a fast pace or gain benefits from a slow pace. Depending on the vessel and the size of the crew, ships might be able to travel for up to 24 hours per day.

Certain special mounts, such as a pegasus or griffon, or special vehicles, such as a carpet of flying, allow you to travel more swiftly.

The type of terrain modifies the speed at which the character can travel. A highway is a straight, major, paved road. A road is a dirt track or similar causeway. A trail is like a road, but allows only single-file travel. A trail in poor repair requires a DC 12 navigation check to follow. Trackless terrain is a wild area with no paths. +2 to Navigation DCs. Poor visibility (fog, darkness) also increases the DC of navigation checks by +4 and forage checks by +2.

For each additional hour of travel beyond 8 hours, the characters cover the distance shown in the Hour column for their pace, and each character must make a Constitution saving throw at the end of the hour. The DC is 10 + 1 for each hour past 8 hours. On a failed saving throw, a character suffers one level of exhaustion.

Frequently asked questions

This depends on the character's speed and the terrain they are travelling through. A character can travel 1 hex in a day at a normal pace, 2 hexes at a fast pace, and 3 hexes at a slow pace.

Difficult terrain halves the speed, so a character travelling through difficult terrain at a normal pace would only be able to travel half a hex in a day.

The number of hexes in your map depends on the scale you want to use. A 6-mile hex is a good choice for wilderness travel, while a 30-mile hex is more suitable for tracking the territory claimed by a mid-sized town or tribe.

Written by
Reviewed by
Share this post
Print
Did this article help you?

Leave a comment